About your Search

20130318
20130326
STATION
CNNW 10
CSPAN 7
CSPAN2 6
KTVU (FOX) 6
MSNBCW 5
KPIX (CBS) 2
KQEH (PBS) 2
KGO (ABC) 1
KICU 1
LANGUAGE
English 46
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> 48 years ago this month, the nation reached a turning point in the civil rights movement. the third and decisive civil rights march from selma to birmingham, alabama. >> kill, burn, bomb destroy. people go into selma is a whole different game. >> reporter: harry bellefonte remembers the backdrop, the selma to montgomery marches in 1965. 50 miles had to be covered, but the real obstacle was hate. not long after 600 marchers began on sunday, march 7th, police brutally beat them, driving them back to selma. >> when bloody sunday happened and then dr. king decided to march again after it. what was the mood? >> the mood was anger. the mood was rebellious. the question is, what do we do in the face of this kind of rage and mayhem. the bottom line is we will go back as often as necessary. >> reporter: bring artists into the movement convince the likes of joe biaz and marlin brando but one of his first calls was to old friend and supporter tony bennett. >> i didn't want to do it, but then he told me what went down, what was going down and how some blacks were burned with gasoline thrown on
of all colors. in 1968, dr. king told now is the time to come from the civil rights movement to the human rights movement. meaningful equality he said could not be achieved through civil rights alone. without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to shelter, the right to quality education, without basic human rights, he said, civil rights are an empty promise. so in honor of dr. king, and all those who labored to end the old jim crow, i hope we will commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to and mass incarceration. a movement for education, not incarceration. a movement for jobs, not jail. a movement to end all these forms of legal discrimination against people, discrimination that denies them basic human rights, to work, to shelter, and the food. now, what must we do to begin this movement? first i believe we've got to begin by telling the truth. the whole truth. we've got to be willing to admit out loud that we as a nation have managed to re-create a caste like system in this country. we've got to be willing to tell the truth in our schools, in our churches and o
are plaintiffs in the biggest civil rights cases. on tuesday the u.s. supreme court will hear arguments and whether proposition 8 is unconstitutional. >> for a family, it is an important struggle and there has been sacrifice and at the same time it has been -- it is a huge honor. >> they will travel to washington, d.c. for the arguments and their twin sons will join them in the courtroom. and ktvu's david stevenson is heading to washington, d.c. to cover the arguments over prop 8 before the u.s. supreme court. we will have live reports from him throughout the day on monday and tuesday. >>> new tonight at 6:00 p.m. a lot of work going on at the golden gate bridge. ktvu's consumer editor tom vacar is live with what drives can expect, including a change with the speed limit there. tom? >> reporter: all of the changes, the best thing you can do is make sure you get yourself one of these. next wednesday morning the last toll takers will leave their booths forever. one basage message -- basic message. >> no more stopping at the toll plaza. >> reporter: people who use the golden gate bridge us
. in 1968, dr. king told advocates the time had come to transition from the civil rights movement to the human rights movement. many photo-quality could not be achieved through civil rights allowed without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to quality education. civil rights are empty promise. in honor of dr. king and all those who labor to win the election crow, i hope we will commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to end mass incarceration. a movement for education, not incarceration. a group that for jobs, not jails. is limited and we limited analytical discrimination against people. discrimination that denies basic human rights to work, shelter and two food. what a sweet deal? first we've got to begin by telling the church, the wiltshire. we've got to be willing to admit out loud that we as a nation have managed to re-create a catholic system in this country. we got to be willing to tell the center places of worship, behind artist and inventor center. we got to be willing to tell the truth so great awakening to the reality of what has occurred can c
-- >> yes. and civil rights. he said to all of them, i agree with all of your positions. i want all of your things. but i have to tell you something, i'm not going to be able to do it. and i'm not going to do it. you're going to have to make me do it. he said that to them, make me do it. so fellow americans, that's our job. if we are calling ourselves citizens, that means we are participants in democracy. it is not that they sit back and they sit in some hall some place. we are the ones in charge. they are our servant. they are there to serve us. if they don't hear from us, then you know, who is going to win out are the money people. the gun manufacturers, national rifle association, people that grease the palms. that's who will win out. but this is what the nra is scared about tonight and gun manufacturers. there's a lot more of us than there are of them. >> no doubt. so they won't be able to hold us hostage. let's talk about something else you're doing, because i want to get this in. first i thought you were making house party part 4 but i discovered that's not what is going on. you are g
unconstitutiona. now, the supreme court has been asked to weigh n which is why these civil rights leaders gage yord to say smi ni decision will affect what happens here in california. >> we're seeing if it's unconstitutional to violate rights in michigan then why is it being done in california? >> in the first year after prop 209 passed, uc bolt lawsuit reported of the 271 students admitted only one was african american. tanya capner is an example of how things changed. >> so you face a situation where i was the only black student in the class after the ban for education program that. is just unacceptable. >> ward connereely is considered to be the man behind prop 209 and michigan's antiaffirmative action law. >> there is nothing more fundamental in my view than right to equal treatment bit government of every citizen in this country. >> bertrall ross teaches law at uc berkeley. >> two laws are similar to each other. i would say whatever the court says about prop 2 would have the same impact on prop 209. >> the supreme court will reaffirm the antiaffirmative action law in the fall. one footnot
in the civil rights division and found perez gave misleading public testimony when he said in 2010 that political appointees cannot make the decisions to drop prosecution of the new black panther party members. you can read that whole story in politico this morning. to want get to your calls though on this subject of the changes in the republican party, this plan for more outreach, scheduled changes with the conventions and primary. al sect next from colorado. good morning, alec. caller: yes, good morning. i think that rand paul did really well at cpac, and marco rubio is pretty good as well. i just want to say that people like mccain, they served honorably in the military and stuff like that. however, it is time for a change, a new kind of republican party that can reach out to a lot more people. the demographics of america changed, i guess it's a little bit more moderate now. it used to be a center-right nation, and now it's probably center-left, so we probably do need to move the needle toward the center a little bit. as for rand paul, i really do like the fact that he had that
of two couples who are plaintiffs in one of the biggest civil rights cases. >> it is exciting, interesting but we feel like we represent many other people and we are humbled by that. >> the u.s. supreme court will hear arguments in whether proposition 8, the same-sex marriage ban is unconstitutional. >> for our family it is an important struggle. and there has been sacrifice and at the same time it is a huge honor. >> reporter: they have been together 13 years and raised 4 boys. a ruling in their favorite could mean same-sex couples can legally marry, affording them some of the same benefits as others. >> life insurance. and healthcare and retirements. there are a number of ways social security wouldn't float either one of us. >> the division was done with the consent of their sons. life has gone on despite international attention to their case. >> life hasn't changed very much. i have to say. we have the same mundane tasks, go to work. >> reporter: they will travel to washington, d.c. for the oral arguments and their sons will join them in the courtroom. live in san francis
. perez currently heads the civil rights division of the justice department. did confirmed he would be the only hispanic member of the cabinet. still, perez could face an uphill battle at his confirmation hearing. republican senators may take issue with his handling of cases the last several years, including his challenges to voter i.d. laws in south carolina and texas. >>> we move on to business. today cypress' parliament will hold an emergency vote to approve bailout terms. it appears the country's law patients would not approve that measure which would result in a loss of much-needed funds. what it means for the rest of europe? we chenlg in with steve sedgwick live in london for us. good morning. >> very good day to you. just when you think europe's getting its act together another crisis comes along. we've had greece, spain, italy, ireland, portugal, now cyprus, the sec-smallest nation wind the european union. what is different about this potential bailout is the original cost is around 18 billion euros for the imf and cb but they want to get the costs down by taxing depositors.
house says he has been the head of the justice department's civil-rights division for a number of years. president obama plans to announce the nomination this morning at the white house in the east room. c-span2 will have live coverage of that starting at 11:30 this morning. congress is set to return to capitol hill today. later this week to work on fiscal spending for the rest of this budget year and for the next fiscal year. the senate is working on the spending bill and it will be the focus this afternoon. you can see live coverage of the senate beginning at 2:00 eastern on c-span2. before the senate c-span2 will be live with carl levin. he will be at the council on foreign relations. c-span3 will be live with a discussion on the persian gulf. a more private first lady, elizabeth much growth refused to continue the tradition of making social calls to washington post political society. she spoke french inside the white house and gained a reputation of being queenly by her critics. we will see the important role she played in 1824 presidential campaign of her husband, john quincy adams
police department's policing problems. civil rights attorney, james chanen will discuss the federal oversight and the police department's decision to hire william bratton for new crime- fighting strategies. the meeting is set for 6:00 tonight at berkeley cop watch. that's at 2022 blake street in berkeley. that meeting, by the way, is open and it's free to the public. >>> 7:50. hardwood flooring is being put in this morning to get hp pavilion ready for march madness. the arena is hosting the second and third rounds of the ncaa tournament thursday through saturday. cal will stays unlv there on thursday. cal is the 12th seed of the east region. unlv is the fifth seeded team. it's 5-1 verses cal. [ cheers ] >> cheers broke out in morago as the st. mary's basketball team was selected to the tournament. the gaels will play tennessee tomorrow night in dayton, ohio. if they win, they will become the 11th seed of the midwest region and play the sixth seed memphis on thursday. >>> 7:51. the ncaa tournament is very important to advertisers as well. total tv revenue from all 68 games expected t
this equal protection idea. they were about race. >> scott: since the civil war. >> right. the historical case. there are parallels between these kinds of discrimination. here is another difference. in 1967 when the supreme court in loving versus virginia banned gay marriage, in that time, only 16 states retained such a ban. the previous decade plus, 14 states moved away from the bans. we still have a situation where 40 states prohibit same-sex marriage. that may change in four or five years. that is different with the mainstream. >> i would say one of the things that is interesting is how fast public opinion is moving. in the case of interracial marriage in 1967, there were polls showing lower levels of support when the supreme court acted than there are today. there is the fact that many states and one reason is a big regional divide. on the east coast and west coast, there is more sympathy than in the south and middle of the country. >> scott: that goes if they strike down prop 8, they have several options if they strike it down. more or less it is california only option or -- >> there
from imprisoned felons. this is a basic civil rights issue and i don't think it's the issue that divides the court. >> joining me now, patricia and head of the supreme court practice. jonathan turley. hello to both of you. welcome. >> hi, alex. >> patricia, i'll begin with you as -- well, let's talk about in terms of prop 8, what we heard just there, correct, i mean, the right to mary already, has it been well-established? >> well, the right to marry is but what the court hasn't grappled with is what is the definition of marriage and that, as we know, is the issue hotly contested in this case and what they will be confronting and in particular what is the role of the courts in that, the role of the states, the role of the federal constitution. so there's much for them to grapple with still. >> jonathan, breakdown for the viewers, if you will, the key issues here for each case. name one key issue for each of them. >> well, first of all, on the threshold level, one is doma, the statute of the defense of marriage act that has formed a discrimination against those who have same-
department's policing problems. civil rights attorney, james chanen will discuss the federal oversight and the police department's decision to hire william bratton for new crime- fighting strategies. the meeting is set for 6:00 tonight at berkeley cop watch. that's at 2022 blake street in berkeley. that meeting, by the way, is open and it's free to the public. >>> 7:50. hardwood flooring is being put in this morning to get hp pavilion ready for march madness. the arena is hosting the second and third rounds of the ncaa tournament thursday through saturday. cal will stays unlv there on thursday. cal is the 12th seed of the east region. unlv is the fifth seeded team. it's 5-1 verses cal. [ cheers ] >> cheers broke out in morago as the st. mary's basketball team was selected to the tournament. the gaels will play tennessee tomorrow night in dayton, ohio. if they win, they will become the 11th seed of the midwest region and play the sixth seed memphis on thursday. >>> 7:51. the ncaa tournament is very important to advertisers as well. total tv revenu
. >> reporter: one of two couples who are plaintiffs in one of the nation's biggest civil rights cases. >> it's exciting, and interesting. but we reel feel like we represent the faces of many, many other people, and we're just humbled by that. >> reporter: the u.s. supreme court on tuesday will hear oral arguments over whether the marriage ban is unconstitutional. >> for our family, it's an important struggle and there's been sacrifice, and at the same time, it's a huge honor. >> reporter: the couple has been together 13 years, and raised four boys. a ruling in their favor could mean they, and other same sex couples in california and possibly across the nation can legally marry. affording them some of the same benefits as heterosexual couples. >> healthcare, retirement. there are a number of ways in which social security wouldn't flow to either one of us, if we were ill. >> reporter: the decision was done with the consent of their sons. the couple says life has gone on, despite international attention to their case. >> life in our house has not changed very much, i have to say. we still have
. which moses did in the bible and dr. king obviously did here in america. to lead the civil rights movement. so i thought it was again, very sincere from president obama, and resonated a lot, i know jewish americans, i would guess with african-americans, also guess more broadly, with most americans, for whom the bible is still their favorite book. >> yesterday's speech when he was speaking to the students yesterday, i mean, personally i thought he hit it out of the park. there was so much applause there, he made so much common sense and i feel like he really struck an emotional tone and tried to connect with the people in the audience. how do you feel about what he said and do you think his words will resonate for some time to come? >> i thought it was an excellent speech. and yes i do think, i hope certainly that his words will resonate for some time to come. this was really a brilliantly constructed visit to israel. obviously he had long and apparently very constructive talks with prime minister netenyahu and with prime minister simon perez. but for the major address, he chose no
historic civil rights legislation the income tax cut in just six weeks after the assassination of president kennedy mix to 80 dead and threatened and praised and did what a hands-on leader does and his hands were huge and the stories about johnson grabbing people by the shoulder and just getting right in their grill to make them realize a one part and it was. how about my dad and the managing of the fall of the iron curtain as the soviet empire was collapsing there were significant dangers that there would be violence of epic proportions to be the the united states could have justifiably done a victory dance over the soviets, particularly for example when the berlin wall fell. i will never forget watching my dad on tv and critics, the pundits were saying he should go over there and celebrate with the german people. had my dad done with the people of this year and now wanted to do rather than being a leader would have created greater fall more abilities for gorbachev to create an orderly transfer without will blood shed. amazingly so. a dictatorship of epic proportions in the 20th century fe
. it's tomas perez, assistant attorney general, who heads up civil rights division. the president is preparing for a visit to israel tomorrow. the first international trip of his second term and first of his presidency to jewish state. after visiting jerusalem he'll head to jordan. >>> this is the internal review detailing where the party went wrong in 2012 and how to reverse fortunes for the next election. >> we have to relate things to people's lives. we have to win the math war, which we do a good job of. but we have to learn how to win the heart war. in presidential elections what is plaguing our party. >> this comes after the first sort of votes of 2016 were cast this weekend with kentucky's paul winning cpac straw poll. we're joined live from washington with mark. i took a look at embargoed copy of this report coming out today. there are more than 200 recommendatio recommendations. >> it comes back to demographsidemographic demographics. what was very troubling for them as well as asian-americans as well. what prebus said on "face the nation" it's going to cost money. this i
's an astounding thing. never in the history of any civil rights movement have we come so far so fast. and, i would say, even if we achieve full marriage equality and all of the other equal status of citizenship in this country, there would be work to be done. let's remember that when we got the jim crow laws off of the books in the signatures for african-americans, it didn't mean the end of racism. and there will still be anti-gay feeling and sentiment in the country that will need to be worked on. but getting the laws in order, that is an important step forward. >> these are all signs of just about every sector of the economy, young people, older people? >> that's right. >> businesses, you know academics, whatever action recognizing that this is an issue whose time has come. right? >> that's right. we've got, i think it's 81% of young people. >> 81%. >> favors same-sex marriage. you know, it's interesting, too, if the republican party is interested in appealing to them young people do not want to be associated with any group, whether it be a religious group
says he thinks his side will win and it won't be close since he says, marriage is a civil right. >> we are not asking for a new constitutional right. the constitutional right to marry is well established. in fact, the supreme court has ruled you can't take away the right to marry, even from imprisoned felons who can't have procreation because they can't get together. but you can't take it away because it's so important, it's a fundamental right of liberty. >> there could be fireworks. there won't be cameras present, but we will get same-day audios to hear how everything goes down. >> it's always interesting. because we get the transcripts fwowrks hear the inflection and the voice, always interesting, so, we will have it. >> yes, we will. >> in the next hour, we will have a fair and balanced debate with two key players in the same cases. the head of the national organization for marriage and the national campaign director for the freedom to marry. where do you stand on the two same-sex marriage cases? tweet us your answers. we will read your responses, later on in this show. they came t
will be there and warren beatty, bay area scientist gregory baitsman civil rights activist deloweros. >>> twitter has been granted a new patent for twitter. the u.s. patent says it is unique because it's independent of devices. that could cause legal confusion for anyone providing similar services but twitter has already said it will only use the patent defensively. so far there's no reaction from other companies like facebook. fans of hostest, twinkies and ding dogs could see the treats back on the shelves this summer. two investment firms are paying $2.5 million for the brand name, recipes and five factories. it's up to the new owners to decide if they will hire bark the former hostess workers. >>> some of the biggest grocery store chains will encourage their customers to eat more fish. they will announce they will not sell a certain type of salmon engineered by a biotechnology company. they are doing this as the fda gets ready to approve the sale of that modified salmon. >>> police say a bay area teenager got burned playing with fire. how his injury is tied to a truck case. the businesses that were tar
. >> congressman john lewis and olympic gold medalist share their experiences during the civil right movement live, saturday at 8 p.m. eastern, part of booktv on c-span 2. continues. journal" host: white house correspondent, thank you for being here. gun control. we saw a couple of things happen in the senate this week area leader reid, the head of the democrats in the senate is coming out now with a proposal, a gun bill. guest: his abilities going to of -- include the pillar his efforts, which is universal background checks. currently, it is against the law to purchase a gun if you are a criminal or have a dangerous record but not all require background checks. democrats are trying to put forward a bill that requires universal background checks. that has been the top priority for president obama. this bill will not include the assault weapons ban, which would ban certain types of high- capacity assault rifles and other weapons. there was not enough support in the senate to feel like that was possible to include and be able to pass the floor in the senate. it is a bit of a blow to the president ag
the civil rights movement live saturday at 8 p.m. eastern, part of booktv this weekend on c-span 2. difference striking between what is happening today and 100 years ago is the columnist of the parade. 100 years ago, the parade was not a parade, so much as a riot. the police refuse to protect the marchers. as they progressed, the crowds got larger and larger. they were very unruly. they had been drinking. they started to throw things at the women. they shouted and told them to go home. not just that, streetcars continued to him see people into the packed crowd the crowd got larger and larger and more aggressive. the women could not go forward. the police were not involved. the secretary of defense called out the calvary to push back the unruly crowd so that the women could continue their peaceful exercise of their first amendment rights. today, this is a wonderful peaceful assembly and as a liberation of how far have come in 100 years. >> this weekend, a look at the centennial celebration of the women's suffrage parade that took place on pittsylvania avenue in march, 1913 sunday at
gregory baitsman civil rights activist deloweros. >>> twitter has been granted a new patent for twitter. the u.s. patent says it is unique because it's independent of devices. that could cause legal confusion for anyone providing similar services but twitter has already said it will only use the patent defensively. so far there's no reaction from other companies like facebook. fans of hostest, twinkies and ding dogs could see the treats back on the shelves this summer. two investment firms are paying $2.5 million for the brand name, recipes and five factories. it's up to the new owners to decide if they will hire bark the former hostess workers. >>> some of the biggest grocery store chains will encourage their customers to eat more fish. they will announce they will not sell a certain type of salmon engineered by a biotechnology company. they are doing this as the fda gets ready to approve the sale of that modified salmon. >>> police say a bay area teenager got burned playing with fire. how his injury is tied to a truck case. the busines
predicting that promise for everybody because of his life. as a civil rights attorney rightsan aide senator ted kennedy, a member of montgomery county's county council, he has helped level playing field where working families can get ahead. this is not chosen -- this is not the first time he was chosen to be a labor secretary. we have governor martin o'malley, and martin appointed, as the secretary of maryland's labor department, where heat implemented the first living wage law. le, he has open pathways for everyone willing to contribute, including people with disabilities withlbgt americans, and immigrants. while he has tackled plenty of tough issues, tom has spent a career as a consensus builder. he has worked with federal, state, and local government levels, and he understands our economy works best when the middle class and those working to get into the middle class have security they need on the job, a democratic voice in the workplace, everybody playing by the same set of word -- rules strict he will make an outstanding secretary of labor, and there are plenty of work to do. we will h
that they don't think is right. >> but the difference there is that the civil union and marriage are not exactly the same thing. and they're not exactly the same thing in a couple of different ways, important ways. one way is in medical coverage. >> but that -- you're talking about a definition. and what i'm saying is that i think the institution of marriage is a religious institution. but you can have the unions that has the same -- that affords the same people as a male/female marriage the same rights and the same protections under the law. >> you can get married by a justice of the peace or captain of a ship. can those unions be called civil marriage. >> we disagree on this. >> i think that it's important to recognize that when you talk about marriage, it is a religious institution and that people can still have the same rights and privileges, but you wouldn't want to force the church to perform those ceremonies and recognize it as a marriage. >> we have to go to commercial break, but this is a challenge. i think this is the big tent issue. but still ahead, new movie takes an unprecedented lo
it in an expedited way subject to rule, protections for privacy, civil rights and civil liberties that people the right to expect? we are making progress on all those fronts in addition to what cathy has said. >> i know my time is over expired so thank you, mr. chairman spent thank you very much. thanks for being here again. senator baldwin, welcome. great to see. please proceed spent i also want to thank the chairman and ranking member for holding this up and down review of the department of homeland security. clearly what was accomplished back in 2003 was no easy task, and i certainly recognize the incredible progress made in the 10 years since the departments creation. but since we're here today i want to focus in on a couple of the areas in which the department can improve or have been pointed out. fortunately, for me, senator ayotte's last question was the first question i was going to ask about in terms of the recommendations in the gao high-risk report on implementing sharing across agency so if you like you tackle that. but i also want to look at another area. mr. dodaro, and your tes
. and equally as important, a level playing field. we will ensure regard for civil liberties and civil rights. today, we look to our prime minister of forming his parliamentary government in the next few weeks. based on his consultations with parliament's come up which is an extension of the same constitutional process that esulted in his nomination. i am very proud of this process. what we are seeing is the third way in the middle east. we now enjoy the benefits of the arab summer for us all. we have to roll up our sleeves. it will be a very bumpy and difficult road. but i look forward to the future. again, mr. president, thank you to jordan. >> thank you very much. it is great to be back in ordan. i am glad to speak with my friend king abdullah. thank you to the people of ordan for their extreme warmth nd hospitality that i remember well from my first visit as a senator. that thing i mainly remember when i came here was his majesty personally drove me to the airport. i will not tell you how fast he was going, but secret service could not keep up. nevertheless, we are very much appreciative
. what would you tell an independent minded gay man who believes the right to marry is a civil right? what would you tell him about why he should vote republican? >> i would tell him, look. we might not agree on every single issue but, for the most part, if you look at where we are at in our economy and look at where we are with educational choice and our military positions and positions on a strong defense in our party for the most part, we agree on almost everyone and doesn't make someone a bad republican. it means we are good republicans and disagree on one or two things. my god. i don't agree with my wife on 100% of the issues but it doesn't mean we don't have a great marriage. i don't see how that is not -- that's not a reasonable position for people to take. i think it's entirely consistent. i think it's a human position to take and i think it's a decent position to take. >> mr. chairman, quickly. this is rich lawrie's column and he was writing this for politico. he said so much depends on the substance. no rebranding is going to make a difference if republican policy is not re
case this is week. some call the push for same-sex marriage the civil rights issue of our time. they say the tide has turned and that it's time for a change. even karl rove thinks, yes, a republican candidate could embrace same-sex marriage. >> you can imagine the next presidential campaign, a republican candidate saying flat out i'm for gay marriage? >> i could. >> and that's all karl rove would say. i'm joined by san francisco city town dennis herrera and austin nimox. good morning to you both. >> good morning. >> thank you for having us. >> austin, you heard what karl rove just said. are you on the wrong side of history? >> the only side of history with regard to marriage is the right one regarding the truth. and that really should be decided by the american people. americans have an inevitable and inalienable right to determine our own history and that's really a fundamental aspect of america. we have a massive political debate going on in this country about marriage. and the last thing we need is the supreme court to take this debate away from the american people, print a
that trade agreement awaiting not deal with people that violate civil rights. exit code needs to clean their act up and they need to be -- mexico needs to clean their act up and they need to be put into a position where they have to help to clean up the border. .uest: debbie is right mexico has tremendous internal problems and i go into el paso, where people are talking with people that go in the car -- go across the border, and i am hearing from mexican citizens that they are trying to clean up the mess in their country. that would stabilize it. trade from the u.s. to mexico is on the uptake right now, so there are positive things happening, but it is an unstable region. host: a quick question about gun control -- the new york -- the "new york times" this morning saying that the colorado governor as a long path to gun limits. as the cochair of the western falcon -- caucus, what do you make of a western state governor looking like he will sign pieces of legislation? guest: i try to be german not to -- driven by not what will catch the voters, but by principle. the 1994 to 2004 they had
people who were supportive of the civil rights movement with african-americans back in the united states in the '50s and 'of -- 60s. he's basically trying to mend fences and there's front page of the big newspaper here that had gone after the president has a big headline that says "obama reassures israel we've got your back," that's the headline the president wanted from this trip. heather: thank you. we appreciate it. ed henry, live. bill: there is a manhunt after a corrections director is gunned down at his own front door. we'll talk with a former corrections director about the dangers that job comes with and why he says his family was under 24/7 surveillance and security. >> i kind of had it figured out right away. sadly because i felt his position would leave him open to some bad opportunities for that. [ male announcer ] with free package pickup from the united states postal service a small jam maker can ship like a big business. just go online to pay, print and have your packages picked up for free. we'll do the rest. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] help brazil reduce its overall relian
working closely with more of the civil rights organizations that have sued. this particular case is, actually, it has been brought by native american tribes, and the reason for that, arizona once again being an outlier in the name supposedly of trying to deny undocumented immigrants from registering to vote which is a nonissue because most undocumented immigrants would not dare to vote. they're afraid to even call the police for a crime. what's happened since 2004 when this law went into effect, over 30,000 citizens have been denied the ability to register to vote or to show when they were at the polls were not allowed to vote. so that is what the lawsuit is about. it's whether the state of arizona can have different requirements than the national voter registration act. >> host: an important issue for illegal immigrants. we actually want to hear from them today, this morning during this segment. if you're an illegal immigrant and you want to call in and give your comments or thoughts on this subject, call us at 202 -- a special line, 585-3883. we can talk about the supreme court de
away. it could be a 9 state solution. right now the highlighted states allow some form of civil union. for those states the court will have to answer a basic question. >> are you trying to signal that same-sex couples could be in a second class status? >> reporter: whatever the decision, the supreme court is likely to leave room for future debate. >> reporter: now legal experts aren't expecting the court to make the decision till the end of june. in the mean time, coming up at 6:00 p.m. we will talk to some of the people who are helping organize tonight's event. back to you. >>> there appears to be support among americans for same-sex marriage. 57% of people say they have a family member or friend who is gay. that is up 12% from 2007. another pole shows support for same-sex marriage rose from 40% to 53%. the news comes a day before the supreme court is due to hear the arguments about california's ban on same-sex marriage. ktvu's david stevenson is on his way to washington, d.c. right now, he will have live reports and stay with us for a break down of the case and the arguments for and
said, look, we want to come out for human rights. let's support same-sex civil union. for the first time in six years, they voted him down. >> argentina ultimately approved legalizing same-sex marriage. father beck will join us on "starting point" at 8:30 am eastern time. stay tuned for that. >>> baseball's biggest rivals will set aside their differences briefly on opening day to honor the victims of the newtown massacre, a moment of silence at yankee stadium before the new york yankees take on the boston red sox. commissioner bud selig is asking all major league teams to wear special ribbons on their uniforms to remember those 26 victims. >> red sox and yankees have actually come together for charitable events. it's a wonderful thing. >> it is. >>> recovery teams have brought up two rocket jips from the apollo space missions. to find, recover and restore these engines. serial numbers have worn out. it's hard to tell what missions they were used for when they were launched into space. that's very cool to recover these engines. >> it is. >>> when will spring finally start showing its
down on the midwest right now and headed east. heavy snow and strong winds are creating dangerous conditions. where the system is heading next. damplts pope francis led his first palm sunday service as cardinal. he reportedly supported civil unions. will he bring that style of leadership to the papacy? this as the u.s. supreme court considers same-sex marriage cases. >>> and believe it or not, there's a relatively simple explanation for a car that wound up on the roof of this house in glen dale, california. the good news -- no one was hurt. >>> first the severe weather hitting the midwest. a huge spring snowstorm is bounding the region from missouri to ohio. susan candiotti is in dayton where the snow is falling and it is not expected to stop any time soon. susan? >> reporter: hi, fred. we're kind of between a bit of a wet snow and flurries right now. things have subsided just a bit. temperatures, fred, right now are just above freezing. that's why you can still see grass on the ground. you don't see any accumulation on the pavement so far. you see over my shoulder, that's i-75. t
right it seems to me to marry. if you want to say they have the 8 state solution where you say these are states that say you you can have civil marriage but can't have marriage per se. can't have a gay marriage. if that is the case why are you stigmatizing marriage in that situation. in the california case a matter of revoking something that has already been granted right to marriage. in both situations it seems you a constitutional right. a human being. an american citizen. you should have equal rights coast-to-coast. you ask the critical question what the rest of the panel is talking about this morning. the politics of it are that if the court rules everybody will be angry at the court and say that supreme court they are an elite and trying to tell us what to do justice kennedy who senator bayh is likely the swing vote. you can't have nine unelected people narrowly focused on the law making big decisions for the country. if that is the way they feel they will make a political decision and say it is up to the the states let them do what they want. con is not a matter of the ci
has evolved is sort of a script that could have been written in hollywood. >> right. >> because in many ways it actually was written in hollywood. it was november 2008. barack obama had just won the white house. >> there's nothing civil about a man marrying another man! >> but proposition 8 passed, taking away the right for gays and lesbians to marry in california. >> california has made it very clear. >> we're sitting there, you know, kind of licking the wounds and saying, what do we do now 0? and serendipitously, a friend of my wife's came by the table and she says, i think you'd be very interested to find out that you might find an ally in ted olsen on your issue. >> that's the ted olsen, the conservative legal icon. >> that stunned you, right? >> yes. it more than stunned me. it stunned me, but i said, if this is true, this is the home run of all time. i mean, the idea that ted olsen, this arch conservative, the solicitor general for george bush who had argued bush v gore and basically put me in bed for a couple of days i was so depressed after bush v gore was interested in
. it is the big national holiday, the biggest holiday of the year in iran right now. when he talks about the great civilization he is trying to reach out to the iranian people saying if we can have a diplomatic solution here you and your isolation in the world community, you end that and become a bigger part of the national community. even as he did that today he did say all options are on the table. twice he said as president of the united states he can't take that away. the president is hoping and believes there are several more months to continue the diplomacy, he is hoping that works. he said at every stop on this trip if it doesn't he reserves the right to use a military strike. >> he seemed to be reaching out beyond the ayatolla, beyond ahmadinejad speaking directly to the iranian people from amman, jordan. on another sensitive issue in response to a question the president seemed a little defensive about why the united states during his administration has not authorized military force to stop the slaughter in syria. listen to this. >> i think what your question may be suggesting is why haven
that every victim feels the same way. >> do you think he'll admit some of the things he says right now against him if you take this to civil court try to get some money out of it will this help you anything he says from behind bars? >> nothing mr. sandusky says or doesn't say is going to affect the civil lawsuits in my opinion. he, as a convicted felon and in fact mr. paterno's family and mr. paterno back when blamed mr. sandusky. penn state blamed mr. sandusky. everyone believes that he is the root cause of this problem. there's no controversy about that. the only issue remaining is pen state's complicity. penn state's enabling mr. sandusky to do what he did. that's what's on the table in the civil cases. >> so, so one of the, one of the pieces of sound from jerry sandusky in this interview that was aired on nbc where jerry sandusky essentially saying he doesn't understand how somebody could have walked into the shower room, mike mcqueary and, and, and jumped to the conclusions that he did about what was going on in there. i mean he's really attacking the mcqueary witness, and also th
. >> major delays. >> you're right. >> all right, jennifer delgado thanks to you. >>> secretary of state john kerry trying to stop the bloodshed in syria's civil war as he travels in the middle east this morning. yesterday he met with the iraqi president nuri al maliki but apparently he made little headway convincing him to stop allowing the flow of arms and troops into syria. secretary kerry wants tighter scrutiny of overflights in iraq. he's accusing iraq of helping syrian president assad by allowing armed fighters from iran to cross into syria from iraq. >>> authorities in mississippi believe a state lawmaker shot and killed herself over the weekend. 63-year-old jessica upshaw's body was found yesterday in former state representative's home. she served in the mississippi legislature for nearly ten years. she represented the district along the gulf coast. >>> an amazing tale of survival by a 9-year-old girl after a horrifying accident that killed her father. the california highway patrol says she was with him in an suv when it veered off california's remote sierra highway in rolled hundreds
in the sub rights division since 2000 currently serves as the assistant attorney general for civil rights. he is the sum of a dominican immigrant in the first hispanic to be named to president obama second term cabinet. the ceremony to case in the white house geese room this morning. here is a look. [background sounds] >> ladies and gentlemen the president of the united states accompanied by thomas perez. [applause] [applause] >> thank you. [applause] everybody have a seat. have a seat. as i have set before my top priority as president is doing everything we need to do to make sure that we are growing our economy and that we are strengthening our middle class. and as i said said in my state of the union address last month, every day we should be asking ourselves three questions. one, how do we make sure america is a magnet for good jobs? number two how do we equip people with the skills they need to get those jobs and number three, how do we make sure that hard work actually pays off with a decent living. these are the challenges that i've instructed my team at the white house and by entire c
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)